Choir

Shalom Aleichem

For Violin, Erhu (or Optional Violin II), Piano, & SATB Choir

Shalom Aleichem for Violin, Erhu, Piano, & SATB Choir

Program Notes

Shalom Aleichem is a Jewish liturgical song composed by Israel Goldfarb in 1918 that is sung every Friday to mark the eve of the Sabbath. Translated from Hebrew as “peace be upon you”, and according to the teaching in the Jerusalem Talmud, two angels accompany people on their way back home from synagogue on Friday night—a good angel and an evil angel. If the house has been prepared for the Shabbat, the good angel utters a blessing that the next Shabbat will be the same, and the evil angel is forced to respond "Amen”; but if the home is not prepared for Shabbat, the evil angel expresses the wish that the next Shabbat will be the same, and the good angel is forced to respond "Amen". This iteration of the piece was commissioned by 6-Wire of the University of Delaware Master Players Concert Series for performance with the University of Delaware Chorale at Carnegie Hall, New York, February 16th, 2019.

Shalom aleichem malachei ha-sharet malachei Elyon,

mi-melech malachei ha-melachim ha-qadosh Baruch Hu.

 

Bo'achem le-shalom malachei ha-shalom malachei Elyon,

mi-melech malachei ha-melachim ha-qadosh Baruch Hu.

 

Barchuni le-shalom malachei ha-shalom malachei Elyon,

mi-melech malachei ha-melachim ha-qadosh Baruch Hu.

{Be}Tzeitechem le-shalom malachei ha-shalom malachei Elyon,

mi-melech malachei ha-melachim ha-qadosh Baruch Hu.

Peace be with you, ministering angels, messengers of the Most High,
Messengers of the King of Kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

Come in peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,
Messengers of the King of Kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

Bless me with peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,
Messengers of the King of Kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

Go in peace, messengers of peace, messengers of the Most High,
Messengers of the King of Kings, the Holy One, Blessed be He.

Stars

For SSAATTB Choir

Stars Score for SSAATTB Choir

Program Notes

Originally written for the ACDA Choral Competition, Stars uses excerpts from Emily Brontë’s famous poem “Stars”. The poem discusses various themes of love for the night sky and an ultimate abandonment due to the sun’s “hostile light”. Written for SSAATTB, the piece begins in a thinned texture with an agitated mood. Upon reaching the chorus, the SAT voices divide into a full choir as the mood quickly shifts to themes of love. Similar to the first phrase, the second also begins by using a thinned texture before expanding and eventually exploring different key areas. The piece comes to a close with a repetition of the chorus, ending on a tranquil chord, resembling that of a calm night sky.